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WESTERN SOLOMONS RESEARCH DATABASE–

 

A Guide to Research Themes

 

By Dr. Graham Baines

 

People have been coming to Solomon Islands for many years to undertake research. Solomon Islanders rightly ask “Wanem nao hem i kam aut long ‘research’ wea iumi save usim”? Of what value is this research for them? What is there that will help to improve their lives, secure land and livelihoods, engage in economic development without social and environmental damage, avoid and resolve disputes, better understand plants, animals and environment and how to manage natural resources, and protect and sustain a diverse cultural heritage and histories?  

To assist Solomon Islanders wishing to access information on topics of particular interest to them, research reports that contain this sort of information are listed below under “themes”. Also included here are some items of so-called “grey literature”; that is, reports of limited circulations that have not been formally published. These include reports prepared by government agencies and NGOs in the Solomons and, in a few cases, relevant reports by development assistance agencies.  

These are not full citations; simply titles. Once a report of interest is identified, then by going to the webpage that lists the research papers and other reports under the names of investigators, the full reference or citation can be seen. Some of these reports can be accessed through this website. Others are to be added later. In some cases a URL is provided for direct access to a report. Most reports in the database are from after 1980, but earlier reports are to be added over time.  

It is the intention of the editors of this website that the research materials made available here by their authors should not only be valuable for their scientific value and as a source of cultural heritage, but should also be used for educational purposes by young Solomon Islanders. Already, the website contains a substantial number of articles and volumes that are out of print and hard to find. It is our hope that teachers in the Western Solomons and throughout Solomon Islands will find this database useful in their future training of students. This is especially relevant in the context of the Ministry of Education’s Distance Learning Centres Programme (DLCP).

 

On the right-side menu is a list of research themes that are covered by the materials in this database. By clicking the theme you are interested in, you will get straight to the relevant section of this Guide, where you can explore the lists of research materials and individual researchers, read notes about the materials, and in many cases access them. This list of research themes, and the materials it covers, will be updated regularly.

 

 


Animals and plants of western Solomons
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A University of Queensland report to the Marovo community by Albert and others, 2006.  Chiniena ba lineana pa Marovo Lagoon [Condition of the marine environments in Marovo Lagoon]

A report by Duke and others, 2007.  Marovo: A lagoon and people facing change, Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiatives that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon. Contents include:

·       The UQ Marovo experience: science based support for community management of marine resources.

·       Marovo: a lagoon and people facing change.

·       Science addressing community concerns about the marine environment.

·       Strengthening community capacity.

·       Social and cultural considerations.

·       Economic considerations.

·       Lessons learned, future directions and recommendations. 

Published scientific papers arising from the UQ programme include:

 

·       Albert, 2007. The health of Melanesian coral reefs: Environmental drivers and social responses.

·       Albert and others, 2007. Conserving marine biodiversity of Marovo lagoon.

·       Grinham, 2007.  Downstream effects of land use on shallow-water benthic microalgal communities in Moreton Bay, Australia, and Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands. 

·       Albert and others, 2008. Algae, gradients and water quality in Marovo Lagoon.

·       Albert, Udy, and Tibbetts, 2008. Responses of algal communities to gradients in herbivore biomass and water quality in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands. 

In recent years there has been strong interest from local and international biodiversity conservation organizations to engage in the Western Solomons. Information on animals, plants and their environment is to be found in reports by WWF (the World Wide Fund for Nature), Greenpeace, the Maruia Society, TNC (The Nature Conservancy) and other organizations. Some of these will be pøosted on this database in the future.

Knowledge of plants and animals of the western Solomons is increasing, with the involvement of Solomon Islander scientists, as in:

·       Boseto, Morrison, Pikacha, and Pitakia, 2007. Biodiversity and  conservation of freshwater fishes in selected rivers on  Choiseul Island, Solomon Islands.

·       Jenkins, Allen, and Boseto, (nd) Lentipes solomonensis, a new species of freshwater goby (Teleostei: Gobioidei:Sicydiinae) from the Solomon Islands.

·       Boseto et al, 2007. Herpetology, community education and logging in Choiseul.

·       Boseto et al, 2007. Freshwater Fishes of Tetepare Island.

Motivated by a global impetus to protect biodiversity a concept of ‘protected areas’ has been considered in various forms by some researchers and organizations. Reports arising from this include:

·       McKinnon, 1990. Solomon Islands World Heritage site proposal: report on a fact finding mission.

·       Aswani and Hamilton, 2004. The value of many small vs. few large marine protected areas in the Western Solomons. 


At times the enthusiasm for protecting biodiversity appears to take precedence over Solomon Islanders’ traditional rights and subsistence needs. Reports that explore this issue include:

·       Baines, 1991.  Asserting traditional rights: community conservation in the Solomon Islands. 

·       Hviding and Bayliss-Smith, 2000. Chapter 13 of Islands of Rainforest.

·       Foale, S. 2001. 'Where's our development?' Landowner aspirations and environmentalist agendas in Western Solomon Islands.

·       Hviding 2003. Contested rainforests, NGOs and projects of desire in Solomon Islands

·       Macintyre and Foale, 2004. Global Imperatives and Local Desires: Competing Economic and Environmental Interests in Melanesian Communities.

·       Foale, and Manele 2004. Social and political barriers to the use of Marine Protected Areas for conservation and fishery management in Melanesia.

·       Hviding, 2006. Knowing and managing biodiversity in the Pacific Islands: challenges of conservation in the Marovo Lagoon.

Drawing on experience in Vella Lavella, guidance has been given to the United Nations Environment Programme by Maffi, Woodley and others, 2007, Biodiversity and Culture.

 

 

 

Forests and food gardens
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A recent (2006) summary of the situation regarding village based agriculture is to be found in the Solomon Islands Smallholder Agriculture Study Volume 4. This can be downloaded from: http://www.ausaid.gov.au/publications/pdf/solomon_study_vol4.pdf

The smallholder study makes reference to the concept of food security for rural communities. A paper on this subject is Woodley, 2001. Taro Caught in the Web of Change: Food Security on Vella Lavella, Solomon Islands.

Now dated information on the nature and extent of natural forests was published by the Ministry of Forests, Environment and Conservation, 1995. Solomon Islands national forestry inventory, the forests of the Solomon Islands, Volume Six: Western Province.

A general background to Western Solomons agroforestry is available in Chapter 2 (“Conceptualising Melanesian Agroforestry”) of Hviding and Bayliss-Smith, 2000. Islands of Rainforest. Some other chapters of this book describe rainforest logging and the issues arising from this.

Other relevant writings by these authors include:

·       Hviding, 1999. Taro irrigation, arboriculture and stratified polities in coastal Melanesia: evidence from the pre-colonial agricultural systems of New Georgia.

·       Bayliss-Smith, 1993. Time, Food and Money in the Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands: Village Surveys in a proposed World Heritage Site. 

·       Bayliss-Smith, Hviding and Whitmore, 2003. Rainforest composition and histories of human disturbance in Solomon Islands

Aspects of the socioeconomics of agriculture are discussed in Furusawa and Ohtsuka, 2006. Inter-household variations in subsistence strategies within a rural society of Roviana, Solomon Islands: An analysis of agricultural production and cash income in relation to socio-demographic factors. 

Reports on forest structure, composition and production include:

·       Burslem, and Whitmore, 2003. Functional diversity and response to disturbance in lowland tropical rain forest on Kolombangara, Solomon Islands. Long term changes in composition and diversity as a result of natural and man made disturbances: case studies from the Guyana Shield, Africa, Borneo and Melanesia

·       Burslem and Whitmore, 1999. Species diversity, susceptibility to disturbance and tree population dynamics in tropical rain forest.

·       Burslem, Whitmore and Denmark, 1998. A thirty-year record of forest dynamics from Kolombangara, Solomon Islands.

·       Burslem and Whitmore, 1996. A long-term record of forest dynamics from the Solomon Islands.

·       Burslem and Whitmore, 1996. Silvics and Wood Properties of the Common Timber Tree Species on Kolombangara.

·       Burslem, Alder and Whitmore, 1996. COSSI: A Cohort Simulation Model of Forest Growth and Yield in the Solomon Islands.

The excessively rapid rate of logging and the exploitative nature of logging operations in the western Solomons has been the cause of much concern. So much so that Prime Minister Hilly, of the western Solomons, when he attempted to stop the destruction, lost his position, undermined by the logger lobby. This is documented in a detailed account by Bennett (2000). For the innovative official Prime Ministerial announcement that led to his downfall see the Hilly-Keating statement 1994.

A technical report on deforestation in western Solomons is Furusawa, Pahari, Umezaki and Ohtsuka, 2004. Impacts of selective logging on New Georgia Island, Solomon Islands evaluated using very-high-resolution-satellite (IKONOS) data. 

 

 

About the sea and fishing
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For an overview of the ‘big picture’ within which the sea of Western Solomons is set, see: Huber and Baines, 2000. The Coral, Solomon and Bismarck Seas Region. For the cultural context, see Hviding, 1996, Guardians of the Lagoon. An example of sea travel and interconnections between islands of Western Solomons is given in Hviding, 1995. Maritime travel, present and past, in Marovo, Western Solomon Islands.

Papers on fishing in the Roviana area include:

·       Aswani,1998. Patterns of marine harvest effort in SW New Georgia, Solomon Islands: Resource management or optimal foraging? 

·       Aswani and Hamilton, 2004. Integrating indigenous ecological knowledge and customary sea tenure with marine and social science for conservation of bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

·      Aswani and Weiant, 2003. Shellfish monitoring and women’s participatory management in Roviana, Solomon Islands. 

The Marovo Lagoon was highlighted in the 1988 publication, Coral Reefs of the World (see pages 277-278 in Volume 3) and has since been the subject of a number of studies:

·       Hviding, 1990. Keeping the sea: aspects of marine tenure in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

·       Hviding, 1993. The Rural Context of Giant Clam Mariculture in Solomon Islands: An Anthropological Study.

·       Hviding and Baines, 1996. Custom and complexity: marine tenure, fisheries management and conservation in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

·       Hviding, 1997.  Fisheries and coastal resources: knowledge and development.

Some research has been designed and conducted by researchers so as to address concerns raised by village communities. For instance, a study was conducted of fish taken from inshore waters for use by tuna boats as baitfish to assess whether this adversely impacted on inshore fisheries productivity. Papers from that study are:

·       Rawlinson, 1989. Catch composition of tuna baitfishery of Solomon Islands and possible impact on non-target species.

·       Blaber and Milton, 1990. Species composition community structure and zoogeography of fishes of mangrove estuaries in the Solomon Islands.

·       Blaber, Milton and Rawlinson, 1990. Diets of the fishes of the Solomon Islands: Predators of tuna baitfish and trophic effects of baitfishing on the subsistence fishery.

·       Blaber, Milton, Rawlinson, Tiroba, and Nichols, 1990. Reef fish and fisheries in Solomon Islands and Maldives and their interaction with tuna baitfisheries.

University of Queensland research has also been modified to incorporate local issues, as reported in Duke and others, 2007. The UQ Marovo Experience: science-based support for community management of marine resources. 

 

Other papers:

 

·       Sabetian, 2002. The importance of ethnographic knowledge to fishery research design and management in the South Pacific: a case study from Kolombangara Island.

·       Kinch, 2004. Aquarium Trade - Western Province.

·       Hamilton, 1999. Tidal movements and lunar aggregating behaviours of Carangidae in Roviana Lagoon.

·       Love, 2006. Environmental change and marine protected areas in Marovo lagoon.

·       Schwarz, Hawes, Manele, Makini, Posala, and Tauku 2007. Mangrove, seagrass and macroalgae resources on reefs in Darwin Initiative Project sites, Solomon Islands.

In Kinch, Kere, Mesia and Bulehite, 2006. Community engagement and participation in the eastern Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  a participatory consultation process was used to identify fisheries related problems and possible solutions; possible impacts of these identified solutions on the social and socioeconomic development of the community; alternative income generating projects to offset the opportunity costs of implementing the identified solutions; and a community-based implementation and management strategy for the community. This report is backed by Kinch, Mesia, Kere, Manioli and Bulehite, 2006. Socioeconomic baseline study: Eastern Marovo lagoon, Solomon Islands.

 

General papers

 

·       Baines, G.B.K. 1985.  A traditional base for inshore fisheries in the Solomon Islands.

·       Kinch, 2005. Socioeconomic Analysis of the Coral Trade in the Solomon Islands.
Sabetian and Foale, 2006. Evolution of the Artisanal fisher; case-studies from Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea.
  http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/Trad/20/Trad20_3_Sabetian.pdf

·       Foale, 2008. Appraising the resilience of trochus and other nearshore artisanal fisheries in the Western Pacific. 

 

 



The earth and the seabed – geology

During the past decade geological research in the Western province has described the area’s position within the “Pacific Ring of Fire”; the rim zone of the Pacific marked by frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, though on smaller scale than elsewhere in the world. This research became even more important due to the 2007 tsunami that ravaged islands in the province, leaving thousands of people homeless and without garden produce (see also the section on Natural Disasters)  

·       Mann, 1996. Fate of Oceanic plateaus at subduction zones.

·       Mann, et al, 1998. Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia group.

·       Mann et al, 1998. Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia group.

·       Phinney et al, 1999. Sequence stratigraphy, structure and tectonic history of the southwestern Ontong Java Plateau.

·       Mann and Taira, 2004. Global tectonic significance of the Solomon Islands and Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone.

·       Cowley et al, 2004. Recent tectonic history of the Central Solomons intra-arc basin.

·       Taira et al, 2004. Incipient subduction of the Ontong Java Plateau.

·       Schmidt et al, 2004. A semi-annual radiocarbon record of a modern coral from Solomon Islands.

·       Taylor et al, 2005. Rapid forearc uplift and subsidence caused by impinging bathymetric features.

·       Taylor et al, 2007. Crustal deformation in Gizo great earthquake.

·       Taylor and others, 2008. Rupture across arc segment and plate boundaries in the 1 April 2007 Solomons earthquake. 

Fisher, and others, 2007. Preliminary analysis of the earthquake  (MW 8.1) and tsunami of April 1, 2007, in the Solomon Islands, Southwestern Pacific Ocean. http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/staff2html/staff/Michael_Fisher.html


 

Management of land and sea resources

 

The way in which Solomon Islanders manage their land and sea resources based on customary tenure has attracted a great deal of research interest.

 

General reports based on experience and observations in the western Solomons include:

·       Baines, 1985. A Traditional base for inshore fisheries development in the Solomon Islands.

·       Baines, G.B.K. 1989. Traditional resource management in the Melanesian South Pacific: a development dilemma.

·       Aswani, 2005. Customary sea tenure in Oceania as a case of rights-based fishery management: Does it work? 

·      Aswani, Albert, Sabetian, and Furusawa. 2007. Customary and management as precautionary and adaptive principles for protecting coral reefs in Oceania.

The most comprehensive report and analysis of resource management under Solomon Islands customary tenure is that reported by Hviding in  his 1996 book. Guardians of Marovo Lagoon: Practice, Place, and Politics in Maritime Melanesia. See, for instance, Chapter 7 – Laws of the Lagoon: Customary Marine Tenure on the Fishing Grounds. Another major contribution, focussed on the land,  is the  book by Hviding and Bayliss-Smith (2000), Islands of Rainforest. 

 

Other papers based on the way Marovo people manage their resources include:

·       Hviding and Baines, 1994. Community-based fisheries management, tradition and the challenges of development in Marovo, Solomon Islands. 

·       Hviding, 1991. Traditional institutions and their role in contemporary coastal resource management in the Pacific Islands.

·       Duke and others, 2007.  The UQ Marovo Experience: science-based support for community management of marine resources. 

·       Albert et al, 2007. Marine management options for Marovo Lagoon.

Studies in the Roviana area have resulted in these reports:

·       Aswani, 1999. Common property models of sea tenure: A case study from Roviana and Vonavona Lagoons, New Georgia, Solomon Islands. 

·       Aswani, 2000. Women, rural development and community-based resource management in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands: Establishing marine invertebrate refugia. 

·       Aswani, 2002. Assessing the effect of changing demographic and consumption patterns on sea tenure regimes in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. 

·       Aswani and Weiant, 2004. Scientific evaluation in women’s participatory management: monitoring marine invertebrate refugia in the Solomon Islands. 

How traditional systems of customary tenure might be brought into the mainstream of economic development continues to be a subject of debate and uncertainty. There is no easy solution to the basic question of how these areas might be made available for development in ways that do not compromise the security of those who depend on these resources for subsistence or fracture the social relationships on which customary tenure is based.

Reports specific to western Solomons that address these issues include:

 

·       Aswani, 1997. Troubled waters in South-western New Georgia, Solomon Islands. Is codification of the commons a viable avenue for resource use regularisation? 

·       Hviding, 1998. Contextual flexibility: present status and future of customary marine tenure in Solomon Islands.

·       Hviding, 1993. Indigenous essentialism? ‘Simplifying’ customary land ownership in New Georgia, Solomon Islands.

·       McDougall, 2005. The Unintended Consequences of Clarification: Development, Disputing, and the Dynamics of Community in Ranongga, Solomon Islands.

·       Berg, 2008. A Chief is a Chief Wherever he Goes: lands and lines of power in Vella Lavella. (see section on the politics of land).

Relevant background to the issues is found in:

·       Hviding and Ruddle, 1992. Marine resources management in the context of customary tenure. 

·       Brown, 2000. The Language of Land: look before you leap.

·       Fingleton (to be added)

·       Baines, 2006. Submission to the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Inquiry into Australia's Aid Program and its impact on human rights and security in the Pacific. http://www.aph.gov.au/house/committee/jfadt/pacificaid/subs/sub27.pdf

·       Sullivan, 2007. Recognition of Customary Land in the Solomon Islands: Status, Issues and Options. http://rspas.anu.edu.au/papers/rmap/Wpapers/rmap_wp66.pdf

 

 

Natural disasters

Cyclones

·       Burslem, Whitmore, and Brown, 2000. Short-term effects of cyclone impact and long-term recovery of tropical rain forest on Kolombangara, Solomon Islands.

·       Whitmore, and Burslem, 1998. Major disturbances in tropical rain forests.

The 2006 earthquake and tsunami

 

·       Albert, Udy, Baines, and McDougall, 2007.Dramatic tectonic uplift of fringing reefs on Ranongga Is., Solomon Islands. 
Furusawa, Maki, and Suzuki, 2008. Bacterical contamination of drinking water and nutritional quality of diet in the April 2, 2007, earthquake/tsunami devastated areas of the Western Solomon Islands. 

·       Suzuki, Maki, Furusawa, Hayashi, and Kawata, 2007. Social Responses and Recovery Processes in the April 2, 2007 Earthquake Tsunami Disaster of the Solomon Islands. <In Japanese>

·       Kinch, 2006. World Fish Center - WWF-SI report on post-tsunami fisheries livelihoods.

·       McDougall, Barry and Pio, 2008. Disaster and Recovery on Ranongga: Six Months After the Earthquake in the Western Solomons. Independent report.

·       Schwarz, Ramofafia, Bennett, Notere, Tewfik, Oengpepa,
Manele, and Kere, 2007. After the earthquake: An assessment of the
impact of the earthquake and tsunami on fisheries-related livelihoods in
coastal communities of Western Province, Solomon Islands.

·       Taylor and others, 2007. Crustal deformation in Gizo great earthquake.

·       Fisher, and others, 2007. Preliminary analysis of the earthquake (MW 8.1) and tsunami of April 1, 2007, in the Solomon Islands, Southwestern Pacific Ocean. http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/staff2html/staff/Michael_Fisher.html

· Fritz and Kalligeris, 2007, Ancestral heritage saves tribes during 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami.  http://www.gtsav.gatech.edu/go/faculty/fritz

·       Taylor, and others, 2008. Rupture across arc segment and plate boundaries in the 1 April 2007 Solomons earthquake.

·       Anon, n.d. Earthquake and Tsunami Hazards along the Solomon Arc. Draft project scoping document.

Disaster relief and rehabilitation

Solomon Islands Government, 2007. Draft Rural Shelter and Housing Strategy & Proposed Assistance Package.

 

 

 

 

Cultural heritage and languages

The establishment of a Cultural Affairs Office by Western Province in 1985 marked the beginning of a period of structured investigation and reporting of cultural heritage. Catherine Cole led that office for some time, encouraging local initiatives and guiding and training Solomon Islanders. See Cole, 1994. Preserving Culture in the Solomon Islands.  The role of this unit is outlined in section 18 of the Western Province Strategy for Development, 1985.

Material culture

·       Kupiainen, 1997. Art, Culture Change, and the Study of Solomon Islands Woodcarving. 

·       Kupiainen, 1997. The Colonial Transformation of Woodcarving in Bellona and Gatokae in the Solomon Islands.

·       Woodley, 1998.Ranonggan Carvers: Stories and River Stones.

·       Kupiainen, 1999. Kastom, Authenticity and Woodcarving in the Solomon Islands.

·       Kupiainen, 1999. Toto isus, Charms and Photos: Visual Ethnography on Gatokae, Western Solomon Islands.

·       Richards, 1999. Spirit of Solomons and Traditional Art Styles in Solomon 
Islands. Exhibition Catalogue. 

·       Kupiainen, 2000. Tradition, Trade and Woodcarving in Solomon Islands.

·       Kupiainen, 2001. Melanesian Encounters - Rencontre mélanésienne.

·       Richards, 2001. Kimbo Stone Figures from the Western Solomon Islands. 

·       Richards and Roga, 2004. Barava: Land Title Deeds in Fossil Shell from Western Solomons.

·       Richards and Roga 2005. Not Quite Extinct: Melanesian bark cloth (‘tapa’) from Western Solomon Islands. 

·       Richards, 2006. Whale Teeth Artefacts in the western Solomon Islands. 

·       Richards, 2008. Short Sighted Gods, a Stone Age Devaluation, and Small Change for Pocketless Societies:  Ceramic Imitation Arm Rings for Indigenous Trade In the Solomon Islands 1880-1920. 

Canoes

 

Canoes in western Solomons were once skilfully constructed from thin planks stitched together with bush rope and caulked. Researchers have a strong interest in the traditional war canoe as this represented the best expression of canoe construction skills and traditional decoration while it also had strong associations with religion and other aspects of traditional life.

 

Reports on war canoes include:

 

Kupainen [details to be entered]

Aswani [details to be entered]

 

A larger study of war canoes in New Georgia (particularly Marovo and Vella Lavella) is under preparation by Graham Baines and Edvard Hviding.

 

Languages

 

A map showing the distribution of languages in western Solomons is available at http://www.ethnologue.com/show_map.asp?name=SB&seq=10

 

 

Reports and Papers written on Western Solomons languages include:

 

·       Davis, 2003. A grammar of the Hoava language, Western Solomons. Canberra.

·       Evans. 2008. Subject agreement in Marovo: synchronic and diachronic perspectivesNew Research in Linguistics and English Language. http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/research/new-research/lel/.

·       Evans. n.d. Third person plural as a zero morpheme: object marking in Marovo.

·       Obata, 2003. A grammar of Bilua. 

Other papers based on languages of the western Solomons:

·       McDougall and Budd, 2007. Community-oriented outcomes of language documentation in Melanesia.

·       Raymond and Budd, 2007. Community and Language in Melanesia.

Stories and legends

Of the many kastom stories still being told in western Solomons few have been published, including:

·       Davis, 1991. Vivinei Ruruhu pa Hoava / Custom Stories from Hoava.

·       Hviding, 1995. Vivinei tuari pa Ulusaghe: Stories and legends from Marovo, New Georgia, in four New Georgian languages and with English translations. 

 

 

 

Customary law and modern law

 

The national Constitution is the basis of all law in the Solomons and there has been much debate, over many years, about what concepts and wording best fit the country’s circumstances and needs. The draft new national constitution can be downloaded from http://www.peoplefirst.net.sb/general/SI_Draft_Federal_const_2004.htm

Western Solomons views on some aspects of a proposed new constitution are reported in:

UNDP, 2003. Constitutional reform consultations, Western Province and in UNDP, 2003. Constitutional reform consultations, Choiseul Province.

See also: Corrin, 2006. Negotiating the Constitutional Conundrum: Balancing Cultural Identify with Principles of Gender Equality in Post Colonial South Pacific Societies.

A comprehensive overview of environment, natural resources and related legislation and regulation in Solomon Islands is contained in a 2003 Report prepared for the International Waters Programme – Solomon Islands, Honiara.

Ken Brown and Jennifer Corrin, both lawyers, each lived many years in the Solomons. Drawing on their experience they have jointly written:

·       Brown and Corrin 2004. Marit long Kastom: Marriage in Solomon Islands

·       Brown and Corrin 2005. Putting Asunder: Divorce and Financial Relief in Solomon Islands.

Other papers of interest by Ken Brown are:

·       Brown, K, 1986. Criminal Law and Custom in Solomon Islands.

·       Brown, 1995. Reconciling Customary Law and Received Law in Melanesia: the Post-Independence Experience in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu.

·       Brown, K, 1997. Customary rules and the welfare principle: Post-independence custody cases in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu.

·       Brown, K, 1999. Conflict in Melanesia: Customary Law and the Rights of Women.

·       Brown, K, 1999. Customary law in the Pacific: An Endangered Species. 

·       Brown, 2000. Indigenous forums: laughed out of court.

·       Brown, 2007. Customary law and sex with under-age ‘promised wives’.

Jennifer Corrin’s contributions include:

·       Corrin, 2006. A Green Stick or a Fresh Stick?: Locating Customary Penalties in the Post-Colonial Era.

·       Corrin and Zorn, 2002. Proving Customary Law in the Common Law Courts of the South Pacific.

·       Corrin and Paterson, Introduction to South Pacific Law.

·       Corrin, 2002. Barava Tru - Judicial Approaches to the Pleading and Proof of Custom in the South Pacific.

·       Corrin, 2005. Putting Asunder: Divorce and Ancillary Relief in Solomon Islands.

 

 

Although neither totally focused an modern law nor traditional customs Berg’s (2008) analysis of a court case in Vella Lavella North New Georgia describes the intricacies of clashing fields of conceptualisation of resources, ownership and land claims

 

Berg, 2008. A Chief is a Chief Wherever he Goes: land and lines of power in Vella Lavella

 

 

 

History and the ways of ancestors

 

The early history of western Solomons is revealed through archaeological research reports such as:

·       Reeve, 1987. Report of the Operation Raleigh Solomon Islands Expedition. 

·       Reeve, 1989. Recent Work On The Prehistory of the Western Solomons.  

·       Reeve, 1990. The Early History of the Western Province: Results of Recent Investigations.

·       Sheppard, Felgate, Roga, Keopo and Walter, 1999. A Ceramic Sequence from Roviana Lagoon (New Georgia, Solomon Islands).

·       Sheppard, Aswani, Walter, and Nagaoka, 2002. Cultural sediment: The nature of a cultural landscape in Roviana Lagoon.

·        Summerhayes and Scales, 2005. New Lapita Pottery Finds from Kolombangara, Western Solomon Islands.

Felgate, 2007. Leap-frogging or Limping? Recent Evidence from the Lapita Littoral Fringe, New Georgia, Solomon Islands.  http://epress.anu.edu.au/terra_australis/ta26/pdf/whole_book.pdf

(this research involved underwater survey for pottery fragments in the Nggerasi and Marovo lagoons).

 

 

Berg, 2008. A Chief is a Chief Wherever he Goes: lands and lines of power in Vella Lavella, concentrates on the island of Vella Lavella, and specifically the North-Western corner, which has not been adequately covered by previous work.

History of the period between of early visits by Europeans and the early twentieth century is addressed in:

Bennett, 1987.  Wealth of the Solomons: A History of a Pacific Archipelago.  This volume is the published cornerstone and benchmark reference for the history of New Georgia from pre contact times up until the present. The analysis deals with a wide variety of sources and materials to provide a detailed picture and important reference work for students of history in this region.

Dureau, 2001. Recounting and remembering first contact on Simbo, Western Solomon Islands.

In Hviding, 1996. Guardians of Marovo Lagoon: Practice, Place, and Politics in Maritime Melanesia, these chapters deal with history: Chapter 3 – History of a “Traditional System”: Transformations, Relations, and Encounters across the sea. Chapter 5 - On Seas and Reefs: Maritime Knowledge and Practice. Chapter 6 – Signs in the Seascape: Encounters with Maritime Histories. Though focused on Marovo there is some information on some other areas of western Solomons with which Marovo had relations.

See, also, The Great Transformations, 1880-1910, Chapter 6 In Hviding and Bayliss-Smith, 2000. Islands of Rainforest.

Findings reported in Aswani and Sheppard, 2003. The archaeology and ethnohistory of exchange in pre-colonial and colonial Roviana: Gift, commodities, and inalienable possessions are discussed by Bayliss-Smith, 2003. The archaeology and ethnohistory of exchange in precolonial and colonial Roviana: comment and by Hviding 2003. ”CA* Comment” on S. Aswani & P. Sheppard, “The archaeology and ethnohistory of exchange in precolonial and colonial Roviana”. 

Sheppard and  Aswani, 2004. Oral tradition and the creation of late prehistory in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

Liligeto, 1997. Babata, my land, my tribe, my people: a written account on practices and traditional history of Butubutu Babata of Patu Laiti – Marovo Island, with recollections from the tribes patriarchs.

Detailed information provided by Marovo informants is presented in Hviding, 1996. Guardians of Marovo Lagoon: Practice, Place, and Politics in Maritime Melanesia. Many other papers prepared by researchers touch on aspects of life in the past. See, also:

Since it was so prominent a factor in population and power shifts in the west the headhunting activities of the past have been a focus of interest. A Special Issue of the Journal of the Polynesian Society (number 109, 1), “Essays on Head-Hunting in the Western Solomon Islands” was published in 2000. The papers in that volume are:

·       On headhunting in the Western Solomon Islands (Aswani). 

·       The Archaeology of Head-hunting in Roviana Lagoon, New Georgia (Sheppard, Walter and Nagaoka).
Changing identities: The ethnohistory of Roviana predatory headhunting (Aswani).  

·       Skulls, Mana and Causality (Dureau).

·       Paths of Pinauzu: Captivity and Social Reproductions in Ranongga (McDougall).

·       An Artefact/Image Text of Head-hunting Motifs (Waite).

 

World War II

 

Boutilier, 1989. ‘Kennedy’s Army’: Solomon Islands at war, 1942-1943.

 

 

 

Knowledge and learning

The Solomons is rich in local knowledge that has developed from long association with the environment in which Solomon Islanders live. Many visiting researchers have recognised this and have not only written about it so as to inform overseas audiences but have also used their skills to help Solomon Islanders to compile their knowledge so that it is recorded and available for younger generations.

A prime example of this is Reef and Rainforest: An Environmental Encyclopedia of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands Kiladi oro vivineidi ria tingitonga pa idere oro pa goana pa Marovo.  Work on this compilation was commenced by Graham Baines in 1985 as part of the Marovo Lagoon Resource Management Project, directed by Marovo people.  Twenty years later, after major effort by a number of Marovo knowledge experts working with Edvard Hviding, UNESCO saw reason to publish this knowledge. It is now being used in Solomon Islands schools and is presented internationally as a model for others to consider adopting. 

Other reports on traditional knowledge of the western Solomons are:

·       Baines and  Hviding, 1992. Traditional Environmental Knowledge from the Marovo Area of the Solomon Islands.

·       Baines and Hviding, 1993. Traditional ecological knowledge for resource management in Marovo, Solomon Islands.

·       Hviding, 1996. Nature, culture, magic, science: on meta-languages for comparison in cultural ecology. Hamilton, and Walter, 1999. Indigenous ecological knowledge and its role in fisheries research design: a case study from Roviana Lagoon, Western Province, Solomon Islands.

·       Woodley (2002) Local Knowledge in Vella Lavella( PhD Thesis).

·       Hviding, 2003. Between Knowledges: Pacific Studies and Academic Disciplines. 

·       Hviding 2003. Both Sides of the Beach: Knowledges of Nature in Oceania.

·      Furusawa, 2004. Interrelations among humans, plants and animals based on folk knowledge. <In Japanese>

·       Woodley, 2005.  Local and Indigenous Ecological Knowledge as an Emergent Property of a Complex System.

·       Furusawa, 2006. The Roles of Western biomedicine and folk medicine in rural Solomon Islands: A quantitative analysis of villagers' response to illness. 

·      Foale, 2006. The intersection of scientific and indigenous ecological knowledge in coastal Melanesia: implications for contemporary marine resource management. 

·       Aswani and Lauer. 2006. Incorporating fishermen’s local knowledge and behavior into Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for designing marine protected areas in Oceania. 

·       Lauer and Aswani, (nd). Indigenous Ecological Knowledge as Situated Practice: Understanding Fishers’ Knowledge in the Western Solomon Islands. 

The use of traditional knowledge in formal education is addressed in: Foale, 2006. Is coral reef conservation possible without science education in Melanesia? Is science education possible without development? Guidance for educators is provided through Hviding, 2005. Village-level Documentation and Transmission of Local Environmental Knowledge, and a study guide and manual produced as Hviding, 2008. Reef and Rainforest: An Environmental Encyclopedia of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands, both for UNESCO.

The late Bob Johannes, is famed for having been the first scientist to alert his marine colleagues to the relevance of traditional fisheries knowledge for modern fisheries management and understanding. He came to western Solomons under the auspices of the Marovo Lagoon Resource Management Project and these reports resulted:

·       Johannes, 1988. Spawning aggregations of the grouper Plectropomus areolatus (Ruppell) in the Solomon Islands.

·       Johannes and Hviding, 2000. Traditional knowledge possessed by the fishers of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands, concerning fish aggregating behavior.

·       Johannes, and Hviding, 2000. Traditional knowledge possessed by the fishers of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands, concerning fish aggregating behaviour.

·       Hviding, 2003. Fieldwork with Bob: ‘The first man to dive all night. 

Other papers on the application of traditional western Solomons knowledge are to be found in:

·       Baines, 1989.  Basing research on the knowledge of Solomon Islands smallholders.  (This paper deals with traditional knowledge of soils and its relevance for agricultural research).

·       Kupainen, 2006. Translocalisation Over the Net: Digitalisation, Information Technology and Local Cultures in Melanesia. 

http://www.wwwords.co.uk/elea/content/pdfs/3/issue3_3.asp.
also:
 http://www.peoplefirst.net.sb/research/

·       Duke and others, 2007.  The UQ Marovo Experience: science-based support for community management of marine resources. 

Even in disasters, traditional knowledge has proved to be useful:

·       Fritz and Kalligeris, 2007. Ancestral heritage saves tribes during 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami.  http://www.gtsav.gatech.edu/go/faculty/fritz

 

 

 

Religions and the roles of churches

A general description of the Cristian Fellowship Church (CFC) by Hviding, 2005 has been published in the Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature. Christine Dureau is writing an ethnographic history of Simbo Christianity.  She is also researching an ethnographic history of the Methodist Mission to the Solomon Islands, 1903-1968. The role of churches in Ranongga has been reported on extensively by Deborah McDougall.

The important role of churches in conflict resolution has been addressed in:

·       McDougall 2008. Religious institutions as Alternative Structures in post-conflict Solomon Islands: Cases from Western Province; and

·       McDougall and Kere. n.d. Christianity, Custom, and Law: Conflict and Peacemaking in the Post-conflict Solomon Islands.

See, also, McDougall, 2003. Fellowship and Citizenship as Models of National Community: United Church Women's Fellowship in Ranongga, Solomon Islands.

Some idea of the impact of the differing teachings of the United Church and the SDA church are reported by Juvik, 1993. Christian denominational influences on attitudes toward resources development, Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.

 

 

 

 

Prominent western Solomon Islanders

 

Parker, 1994. Maekera: the life story of hereditary chief Nathan Kera and Saikile community of Solomon Islands. [Solomonesia Productions – privately published]

Zoloveke, 1980. Zoleveke: A Man from Choiseul.

Carter, 1990. Yours in his service: a reflection on the life and times of Reverend Belshazzar Gina of Solomon Islands.

Gina, Bennett and Russell, 2003. Journeys in a Small Canoe: The Life and Times of Lloyd Maepeza Gina of Solomon Islands.

Each of these books provides information not only on the individual but on the historical and social context in which he was born, raised and lived. Gina’s book, for instance, reveals the importance of family and genealogy; the web of connections mediated by marriage, adoption, and even abduction; the identification of people with land; the exciting days of inter-island raiding and head hunting along with the horrors for victims; the labor trade; the coming of Christianity and missionaries leaving a lasting impression on the faith of the people; the suffering that the Japanese invasion induced and the material prosperity and mental stimulation that the Americans injected into the colonial outpost; the resistance and accommodation by Solomon Islanders to the colonial power and its officials; the attraction and repulsion of the colonial order; the sometimes-ambivalent connections with other Pacific Islanders; the challenges of Independence, its hopes, and disappointments; and the opportunities of the wider world.

 

 

 

Development and change

The environmental and resource management context for development in the early years of Independence was outlined in a report: Baines, 1981.  Environmental Management for Sustainable Development in the Solomon.  This was followed by Baines, 1989. Traditional resource management in the Melanesian South Pacific:  a development dilemma, which is based on western Solomons experience. 

A reading of Hviding and Bayliss-Smith, 2000. Chapter 7 of Islands of Rainforest – Colonialism, Coconut Overlay and the “Age of Development”, and other chapters provides a background in agricultural development that, though focused on Marovo and New Georgia, illustrates a situation common to all western Solomons.

For many years governments attempted to plan for development on a national basis. Frustrated by the failure of “national planning” to engage with provinces as partners, Western Solomons Province made its own arrangements, establishing a Resource Development Unit and bringing together the Planning Officers of all Provinces to share experiences. This was reported in Provincial Planning Conference, 1983.

Work began under Premier Hilly on the formulation of development policies suited to western Solomons. These were presented in the form of a Strategy for Development, 1985, finalised under Premier Tausinga. Though prepared over twenty years ago this document is still relevant to the situation faced today.

An effort to encourage community-based development in the 1980s is outlined in McKinnon, 1985. Vella Lavella 2000: a report and proposal. On the basis of earlier experience in Vella Lavella see, also:  McKinnon, 1976. Chayanov in the Solomons: a study of socio-economic motives in resource use.

Later papers and reports that address the issues of development and change in western Solomons include:

Hviding and Baines, 1994.  Community-based Fisheries Management, Tradition and the Challenges of Development in Marovo, Solomon Islands. 

Berg, 2008. A Chief is a Chief Wherever he Goes: lands and lines of power in Vella Lavella (see, particularly, “Encountering the weak state”).

The tuna fishery is of particular significance for the western Solomons. These papers are relevant:

·       Evans, and Nichols, 1986. The baitfishery of Solomon Islands. Honiara: Ministry of Natural Resources.

·       Barclay K, Wakabayashi Y. 2000. Solomon Taiyo Ltd – Tuna Dreams Realized?” 

·       Barclay, 2004. Mixing Up: Social Contact and Modernization in a Japanese Joint Venture in the Solomon Islands.

·       Barclay, 2005, Tuna Dreams Revisited: Economic Contributions from a Tuna Enterprise in Solomon Islands.

·       Barclay, with Cartwright, 2007. Capturing Wealth from Tuna: Case Studies from Pacific Island Countries.

·       Barclay, 2007. Governance of Tuna Industries: The Key to Economic Viability and Sustainability in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean.

·       Barclay, 2008. A Japanese Joint Venture in the Pacific: Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna.

Logging of rainforests is addressed in:

Baines, 1992. Training for customary landholders …

Rankine, 1992. WWF report on guidance regarding landholder timber utilisation on Vella Lavella

Cassells, 1993.

 

A WWF report: Moseby and Read, 1999. A monitoring program to assess potential future impacts of the Silvania oil palm project on the marine resources of Marovo Lagoon (and note, also, a Prime Ministerial statement on this project, Hilly-Keating statement 1994).

In Hviding and Bayliss-Smith, 2000. Islands of Rainforest – see Chapter 9 - “The Forest as a Commodity”, and subsequent chapters of this book.

A detailed case study of one such logging enterprise is given in Berg, 2008. A Chief is a Chief Wherever he Goes: lands and lines of power in Vella Lavella. This case reveals the localised responses to logging and the subsequent court cases that transforms local communities and notions of kinship and leadership in the island

Globalization

The process of globalization of Solomons’ natural resources has been underway for some time. It has intensified in the course of the recent decades of removal of forest resources. The population of Solomon Islanders is growing as this decline in resources takes place and this adds to uncertainties about the future. Papers that deal with this topic include:

·       Burman, 1981. Time and socioeconomic change on Simbo, Solomon Islands.  [need re-read this paper to ensure it is relevant to this section]

·       Hviding, 1996, discusses “encounters with development” in Chapter 8 of Guardians of the Lagoon – The Work of the Guardians: Confronting Global Systems.

Mariculture

The farming of seaweed, pearls and giant clams has been trialled in the western Solomons. For a report on the cultivation of Eucheuma seaweed, see Rarumana 1993.

A report with practical advice on the farming of clams for export markets and how such a practice might be accommodated in customary tenure is: Hviding, 1993. The rural context of giant clam mariculture in Solomon Islands.

Over the years there have been many efforts to establish commercial inshore fisheries projects. A question now being asked is “Should inshore marine food species be protected from commercial development and kept for the needs of those who depend on them for survival? This idea is discussed in: Foale, 2008. A preliminary exploration of relationships among fishery management, food security, and the Millenium Development Goals in Melanesia.

The complexity and uncertainty of change from economic development is now increased by the climate change factor. Little has been written on this in respect of the Solomons, but note: Foale, 2008. Conserving Melanesia’s Coral Reef Heritage in the Face of Climate Change. 

 

 

 

 


Listing of papers on the WSRD website as at 21 December 2008

 

 

Albert, S., Udy, J., Tibbetts, I., Duke, N., Neil, D., Love, M., Roelfsema, C. and Ross, A. 2006.  Chiniena ba lineana pa Marovo Lagoon [Condition of the marine environments in Marovo Lagoon].  Report to Marovo community. University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Albert, S., Love, M., Roelfsema, C., Duke, N., Udy, J. and Tibbetts, I. 2007 Marovo: A lagoon and people facing change, in N. Duke et al. (eds) Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands,29-41.  The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Albert, S., Love, M., Udy, J., Tibbetts, I., Roelfsema, C., Neil, D., Marion, G., Hough, S., Ross A. and Duke, N.2007.  Science addressing community concerns about the marine environment.  In N. Dukeet al. (eds)Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands, 43-83.  The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Albert, S., Udy, J. and Tibbetts, I. 2008. Responses of algal communities to gradients in herbivore biomass and water quality in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Coral Reefs. 27: 73-82

Albert, S., J. Udy, G.B.K. Baines, and D. McDougall 2007.Dramatic tectonic uplift of fringing reefs on Ranongga Is., Solomon Islands. Coral Reefs 26(4): 983-983.

Albert, S. 2007. The health of Melanesian coral reefs: Environmental drivers and social responses. PhD Thesis, Centre for Marine Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Albert et al (2007) Tectonic uplift of fringing reefs (online article).pdf

Albert et al (2008) Algae, gradients and water quality in Marovo Lagoon (report).pdf

Albert et al (2007) Conserving marine biodiversity of Marovo lagoon (report).zip

Albert et al (2007) Marine management options for Marovo Lagoon (report).pdf

Albert et al () Conditions of the marine environments of Marovo lagoon (report in Marovo).pdf

Lauer, M and S. Aswani. In press. Indigenous Ecological Knowledge as Situated Practice: Understanding Fishers’ Knowledge in the Western Solomon Islands. American Anthropologist

AswaniS and I. Vaccaro. 2008. Lagoon Ecology and Social Strategies: Habitat Diversity and Ethnobiology.Human Ecology 36: DOI 10.1007/s10745-007-9159-9

Aswani, S, S. Albert, A. Sabetian & T. Furusawa. 2007. Customary Management as Preventive and Adaptive Management for Protecting Coral Reefs in Oceania. Coral Reefs 26 (4): 1009-1021.

Aswani, S and T. Furusawa. 2007. Do MPAs Affect Human Health and Nutrition? A Comparison among Villages in Roviana, Solomon Islands. Coastal Management 35 (5): 545-565.

Cinner. J and S. Aswani. 2007. Integrating Customary Management into the Conservation of Coral Reef Fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Biological Conservation 140 (3/4): 201_216.

Aswani, S. and M. Lauer. 2006. Incorporating fishermen’s local knowledge and behavior into Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for designing marine protected areas in Oceania. Human Organization 65 (1): 80_101.

Aswani, S. 2005. Customary sea tenure in Oceania as a case of rights-based fishery management: Does it work? Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 15: 285_307.

Aswani, S., and P. Weiant. 2004. Scientific evaluation in women’s participatory management: monitoring marine invertebrate refugia in the Solomon Islands. Human Organization 63: 301_319.

Aswani, S., and R. Hamilton. 2004. Integrating indigenous ecological knowledge and customary sea tenure with marine and social science for conservation of bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Environmental Conservation 31 (1): 69_83.

Sheppard, P., R. Walter, and S. Aswani. 2004. Oral tradition and the creation of late prehistory in Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Special Issue: Archaeology and Anthropology in the Western Pacific: Essays in Honour of Jim Specht. Records of the Australian Museum 29: 123_132.

Aswani, S., and P. Sheppard. 2003. The archaeology and ethnohistory of exchange in pre-colonial and colonial Roviana: Gift, commodities, and inalienable possessions. Current Anthropology 44: s51_78.

Aswani, S. 2002. Assessing the effect of changing demographic and consumption patterns on sea tenure regimes in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands. Ambio 31: 272_284. 


Aswani, S. 2000. Women, rural development and community-based resource management in the Roviana Lagoon, Solomon Islands: Establishing marine invertebrate refugia. Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin 12: 11_22. 

Aswani, S. 2000. Changing identities: The ethnohistory of Roviana predatory headhunting. Journal of the Polynesian Society 109: 39_70. 

Aswani, S. 2000. On headhunting in the Western Solomon Islands. In:Headhunting in the Western Solomon Islands, Shankar Aswani, (ed.). Journal of the Polynesian Society 109: 4_7.

Aswani, S. 1999. Common property models of sea tenure: A case study from Roviana and Vonavona Lagoons, New Georgia, Solomon Islands. Human Ecology 27 (3): 417_453.

 
 Aswani, S. 1998. Patterns of marine harvest effort in SW New Georgia, Solomon Islands: Resource management or optimal foraging? Ocean and Coastal Management 40 (2/3): 207_235.

Articles/Book Chapters/Dissertation (non-peer or editor reviewed)

Aswani, S. 2008. Forms of leadership and violence in Malaita and in the New Georgia Group, Solomon Islands. In Exchange and Sacrifice. Pamela J. Stewart and Andrew Strathern, Eds., pp 171_193, Carolina Academic Press: Durham, North Carolina.

Weiant, P. and S. Aswani. 2006. Early Effects of a Community-based Marine Protected Areas on Participating Households’ Food Security Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin 19: 16_31.

Aswani, S., and R. Hamilton. 2004. The value of many small vs. few large marine protected areas in the Western Solomons. Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin 16: 3_14.

Aswani, S., and P. Weiant. 2003. Shellfish monitoring and women’s participatory management in Roviana, Solomon Islands. SPC Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 12: 3_11

Sheppard, P., S. Aswani, R. Walter, and T. Nagaoka. 2002. Cultural sediment: The nature of a cultural landscape in Roviana Lagoon. In: Pacific Landscapes: Archaeological Approaches in Oceania. T. Ladefoged and M. Graves (eds.), pp. 37_61. Los Osos, CA: Easter Island Foundation.

Aswani, S. 1998. The use of optimal foraging theory to assess the fishing strategies of Pacific Island artisanal fishers: A methodological review. Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin 9: 21_26.

Aswani, S. 1997. Troubled waters in South-western New Georgia, Solomon Islands. Is codification of the commons a viable avenue for resource use regularisation? Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin. South Pacific Commission. Nouméa, New Caledonia 8: 2_16.
  
Aswani, S. 1997. Customary Sea Tenure and Artisanal Fishing in the Roviana and Vonavona Lagoons: Solomon Islands. The Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Resource Utilization. Unpublished University of Hawaii Ph.D. dissertation.

Aswani (1998) Marine harvest in New Georgia (article).pdf

Aswani (1999) Common property models of sea tenure in Roviana and Vonavona (article).pdf

Aswani and Ambio (2002) Changing demographic and consumption patterns and sea tenure (article).pdf

Aswani and Sheppard (2003) Archaeology, ethnohistory and exchange in Roviana (article).pdf

Sheppard et al (2004) Oral tradition and the creation of late prehistory in Roviana (article).pdf

Aswani and Weiant (2004) Women and Marine management in Solomon Islands (article).pdf

Aswani and Hamilton (2004) Knowledge, sea tenure and social science (article).pdf

Aswani and Hamilton (2004) Marine protected areas in Western Solomon Islands (article).pdf

Aswani (2005) Customary sea tenure in Oceania (article).pdf

Weiant and Aswani (2006) Community based marine protected area and food security (article).pdf

Aswani et al (2007) Customary management for protecting coral reefs in Oceania (article).pdf

Aswani and Furusawa (2007) Do marine protected areas affect human nutrition and health (article).pdf

Cinner and Aswani (2007) Integrating customary management into marine conservation (review).pdf

Aswani (2007) Forms of leadership and violence in Malaita and New Georgia (article).pdf

Barbier et al (2008) Coastal ecosystem management and nonlinear ecological functions and values

Aswani and Vaccaro (2008) Lagoon ecology and social strategies (article).pdf 

Baines, G.B.K. 1989. “Traditional resource management in the Melanesian South Pacific: a development dilemma.” In Berkes, F. (ed.) Common Property Resources: Ecology and Community-Based Sustainable Development. London, Belhaven Press.

Baines, G.B.K., & E. Hviding, 1993. “Traditional ecological knowledge for resource management in Marovo, Solomon Islands”, in Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Wisdom for Sustainable Development, N. Williams and G.B.K. Baines (eds.), 56-65. Canberra: Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University.

Hviding, E. and Baines, G.B.K. (1994).  Community-based Fisheries Management, Tradition and the Challenges of Development in Marovo, Solomon Islands. Development and Change 25: 13 -39.

Barclay, K. 2008. A Japanese Joint Venture in the Pacific: Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna. London: Routledge.

Barclay, K, with I. Cartwright 2007. Capturing Wealth from Tuna: Case Studies from Pacific Island Countries. Canberra: Asia Pacific Press, Australian National University.

Barclay, K. 2007. “Western, Japanese and Islander Perceptions of Japanese Fishing Practices: Ecology and Modernization in the Pacific”, Japan Focus <http://www.japanfocus.org/products/details/2508> (accessed 31 August 2007)

Barclay, K. 2007. “Governance of Tuna Industries: The Key to Economic Viability and Sustainability in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean’, Marine Policy 31: 348-358.

Barclay, K. 2005, “Tuna Dreams Revisited: Economic Contributions from a Tuna Enterprise in Solomon Islands”,Pacific Economic Bulletin 20(3): 78-93.

Barclay, K. 2004. “Mixing Up: Social Contact and Modernization in a Japanese Joint Venture in the Solomon Islands”, Critical Asian Studies 36(4): 507-540.

Barclay K, Wakabayashi Y. 2000. “Solomon Taiyo Ltd – Tuna Dreams Realized?” Pacific Economic Bulletin 15(1): 34-47.

Barclay, K. 2008. “Fisheries and Aquaculture” in Solomon Islands Diagnostic Trade Integration Study, Integrated Framework, implementing agency: United Nations Development Program, contact: Heinz Vaekesa, Director External Trade, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and External Trade, hvaekesa@dfa.gov.sb .

 Bayliss-Smith, Tim 1993. Time, Food and Money in the Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands: Village Surveys in a proposed World Heritage Site.  Technical Paper 299, CSC(93) EPP-19, Commonwealth Science Council, London. 25p.

Bayliss-Smith, Tim 1999. “Intensification in the Pacific: comment”. Current Anthropology, 40: 323-324.
Hviding, Edvard and Tim Bayliss-Smith 2000. Islands of Rainforest: Agroforestry, Logging and Ecotourism in Solomon Islands. Aldershot: Ashgate. 371p.


Bayliss-Smith, Tim,  Edvard Hviding and Tim Whitmore 2003. “Rainforest composition and histories of human disturbance in Solomon Islands”.  Ambio 32(5): 346-352.


Bayliss-Smith, Tim 2003. “The archaeology and ethnohistory of exchange in precolonial and colonial Roviana: comment”. Current Anthropology 44 (suppl.): S70-S71.


 Bayliss-Smith, Tim 2006. “Fertility and depopulation: childlessness, abortion and introduced disease in Simbo and Ontong Java, Solomon Islands”, in Population, Reproduction and Fertility in Melanesia, S. Ulijaszek (ed.), 13-52. Oxford: Berghahn.

Bayliss-Smith, Hviding & Whitmore (2003) - Rainforest Composition (0.214MB).pdf

Bayliss-Smith (2006) Simbo and Ontong Java depopulation (0.173MB).pdf

Berg (2008) A Chief is a Chief Wherever he Goes (Dr.Polit. thesis).pdf

Boseto, D., Morrison, C., Pikacha, P., and Tikai Pitakia, T. 2007. Biodiversity and  conservation of freshwater fishes in selected rivers on  Choiseul Island, Solomon Islands. The South Pacific Journal of Natural Science. 3, 16- 21

Jenkins, A.J., Allen, G.R., and Boseto, D., (In Progress-final stage) Lentipes
solomonensis, a new species of freshwater goby (Teleostei: Gobioidei:Sicydiinae) from the Solomon Islands.

Boseto et al (2007) Biodiversity and conservation of freshwater fishes in selected rivers on Choiseul (article).pdf

Boseto et al (2007) Herpetology, community education and logging in Choiseul (article).pdf

Boseto et al (2007) Freshwater Fishes of Tetepare Island (article).pdf

Brown, K. Criminal Law and Custom in Solomon Islands’ (1986) Q.I.T. Law Journal 133.

‘Customary rules and the welfare principle: Post-independence custody cases in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu’ (1997) 21 Journal of Pacific Studies 83.
 
‘Customary law in the Pacific: An Endangered Species’ (1999) 3 Journal of South Pacific Law.
 
‘Conflict in Melanesia: Customary Law and the Rights of Women’ (1999) 24 Commonwealth Law Bulletin London 1334 (with Jennifer Corrin).
 
 
‘The Language of Land: look before you leap’ (2000) 4 Journal of South Pacific Law.
 
‘Indigenous forums: laughed out of court (2000) 25(5) Alternative Law Journal 216.
 
‘More on Democratic Fundamentals in Solomon Islands: Minister for Provincial Government v Guadalcanal Provincial Assembly.’ (2001) 32(3) Victoria University of Wellington Law Review 653 (with Jennifer Corrin).
 
‘Marit long Kastom: Marriage in Solomon Islands’ (2004) 18 International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family 52 (with Jennifer Corrin). 

‘Putting Asunder: Divorce and Financial Relief in Solomon Islands’ Summer (2005) Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal 85 (with Jennifer Corrin).
 
Reconciling Customary Law and Received Law in Melanesia: the Post-Independence Experience in Solomon Islands and Vanuatu Charles Darwin University Press NT Australia 1995.
 
‘Customary law and sex with under-age ‘promised wives’ (2007) 32(1) Alternative Law Journal.

Burslem, D.F.R.P. & Whitmore, T.C. (2003) Functional diversity and response to disturbance in lowland tropical rain forest on Kolombangara, Solomon Islands. Long term changes in composition and diversity as a result of natural and man made disturbances: case studies from the Guyana Shield, Africa, Borneo and Melanesia (ed. H. Ter Steege), pp. 61-77. Tropenbos International, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Burslem, D.F.R.P., Whitmore, T.C. & Brown, G.C. (2000) Short-term effects of cyclone impact and long-term recovery of tropical rain forest on Kolombangara, Solomon Islands. Journal of Ecology, 88, 1063-1078.

Burslem, D.F.R.P. & Whitmore T.C. (1999) Species diversity, susceptibility to disturbance and tree population dynamics in tropical rain forest. Journal of Vegetation Science, 10, 767-776.

Burslem, D.F.R.P., Whitmore, T.C. & Denmark, N. (1998) A thirty-year record of forest dynamics from Kolombangara, Solomon Islands. Forest Biodiversity Research, Monitoring and  Modelling. Conceptual Background and Old World Case Studies (eds F. Dallmeier & J.A. Comiskey), pp 633-645. UNESCO, Paris and Parthenon, Carnforth, Lancs.

Whitmore, T.C. & Burslem, D.F.R.P. (1998) Major disturbances in tropical rain forests. Dynamics of Tropical Communities (eds D.M. Newbery, H.H.T. Prins & N.Brown), pp. 549-565. Blackwell Science, Oxford.

Burslem, D.F.R.P. & Whitmore, T.C. (1996) A long-term record of forest dynamics from the Solomon Islands. Biodiversity and the Dynamics of Ecosystems (eds I.M. Turner, C.H. Diong, S.S.L. Lim & P.K.L. Ng), pp. 121-131. DIWPA Series Volume 1. DIWPA, Kyoto, Japan. 383 pp.

Burslem, D.F.R.P. & Whitmore, T.C. (1996) Silvics and Wood Properties of the Common Timber Tree Species on Kolombangara. Tropical Forestry Papers 34 and Solomon Islands Forest Record 7, Oxford Forestry Institute, Oxford, U.K. 61 pp.

Burslem, D.F.R.P., Alder, D. & Whitmore, T.C. (1996) COSSI: A Cohort Simulation Model of Forest Growth and Yield in the Solomon Islands. Oxford Forestry Institute Occasional Paper 50, Oxford, U.K. 64 pp.

 Cole, Catherine C. 1994. “Preserving Culture in the Solomon Islands”. Muse, Vol. 12, No. 1, Spring 1994: 30-34, ill. Ottawa: Canadian Museums Association, (also in French)

 Cole (1994) Preserving culture in the Solomon Islands (article).pdf

Corrin:

(A) the status of and the relationship between introduced law and customary law in small island countries of the South Pacific, concentrating on Melanesia, but also covering parts of Micronesia and Polynesia;
(B) conflict between customary law and human rights and, more particularly, the conflict between customary law and anti-discrimination provisions;
(C) the status of and the relationship between introduced law and customary law in the context of substantive areas of law;
(D) courts, civil practice, procedure and evidence;
(E) other topical legal matters. This research is mainly, but not exclusively, South Pacific based.

 Davis, Karen 2003. A grammar of the Hoava language, Western Solomons. Canberra : Pacific Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University. xvi + 332 pp

Davis, Karen 1991. Vivinei Ruruhu pa Hoava / Custom Stories from Hoava. Collected and translated by Karen Davis. Gizo: Western Province Government, Cultural Affairs Office. 57p.

 Dureau

2006. To Die For? Pacific Studies 29 (3/4): 106-115.

2005. Keeping for Giving, Keeping for Keeping: Property Taboo on Simbo. In Claudia Gross, Harriet D. Lyons & Dorothy A. Counts (eds), A Polymath Anthropologist: Essays in Honour of Ann Chowning. Research in Anthropology & Linguistics Monograph 6. Auckland: The Department of Anthropology

2003. Scrutinising Birth on Simbo. In Julie Park & Ruth Fitzgerald (eds), Medical Anthropology: Tales from the Antipodes. Special Issue. Sites 1 (1): 30-55.

2001. Recounting and remembering first contact on Simbo, Western Solomon Islands”, in. J. Mageo (ed.) Reconfiguring history in the Pacific. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, pp. 130-162.

2001. “Mutual goals?: Family planning on Simbo, Western Solomon Islands”, in, M. Jolly & K. Ram (eds) Borders of being.  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, pp. 232-261. 

2000  “Skulls, mana and causality”. Essays on Head-Hunting in the Western Solomon Islands.  Special Issue of Journal of the Polynesian Society 109 (1): 71-98.

1998 “Decreed affinities: Nationhood and the Western Solomon Islands” Journal of Pacific History. 33 (2): 197-220.

1998 “From sisters to wives: Changing contexts of maternity on Simbo, Western Solomon Islands”, in, K. Ram & M. Jolly (eds) Maternities and modernities: colonial and postcolonial experiences in Asia and Pacific.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 239-274.

1993 “Nobody asked the mother: Women and maternity in the western Solomon Islands” Oceania 64: 18-35.

Bethwyn Evans. 2008a. Subject agreement in Marovo: synchronic and diachronic perspectivesNew Research in Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester, http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/research/new-research/lel/.

Bethwyn Evans. 2008b. From aspect/mood marker to discourse particle: reconstructing syntactic and semantic change. New Research in Linguistics and English Language, University of Manchester,http://www.llc.manchester.ac.uk/research/new-research/lel/.

Bethwyn Evans. in press. Third person plural as a zero morpheme: object marking in Marovo, in Claire Bowern, Bethwyn Evans and Luisa Miceli (eds) Morphology and language history. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 287-304. (to be published June 2008)

Interview , Ruki the fisherman. Lester George.
Sound file (mp3 - 1.7MB)
Explanation - doc 

Foale, S. J. 2008. Appraising the resilience of trochus and other nearshore artisanal fisheries in the Western Pacific. SPC Trochus Information Bulletin (14) (In Press)


Foale, S. J. 2008. Conserving Melanesia’s Coral Reef Heritage in the Face of Climate Change. Historic Environment 21(1): 30-36


Macintyre, M. A. and S. J. Foale 2007. Land and Marine Tenure, Ownership and New Forms of Entitlement on Lihir: Changing notions of property in the context of a goldmining project. Human Organization 66 (1): 49-59.


Sabetian, A. and S. J. Foale 2006. Evolution of the Artisanal fisher; case-studies from Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. SPC Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Information Bulletin 20: 3-10.http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/Trad/20/Trad20_3_Sabetian.pdf


Foale, S. J. 2006. The intersection of scientific and indigenous ecological knowledge in coastal Melanesia: implications for contemporary marine resource management. International Social Science Journal 58: 129-137.


Foale, S. J. 2006. Is coral reef conservation possible without science education in Melanesia? Is science education possible without development? Proceedings of the 10th International Coral Reef Symposium, Okinawa.Session 4: 1274-1278.


Foale, S. J. and M. A. Macintyre 2005. Green Fantasies: Photographic representations of biodiversity and ecotourism in the Western Pacific. Journal of Political Ecology 12: 1-22.http://jpe.library.arizona.edu/volume_12/FoaleMacintyre2005.pdf


Foale, S. J. and B. Manele 2004. Social and political barriers to the use of Marine Protected Areas for conservation and fishery management in Melanesia. Asia Pacific Viewpoint 45 (3): 373-386.


Macintyre, M. A. and S. J. Foale 2004. ‘Global Imperatives and Local Desires: Competing Economic and Environmental Interests in Melanesian Communities’. In V. Lockwood (ed), Globalization and Culture Change in the Pacific Islands.  New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, pp. 149-165.


Foale, S. 2001. 'Where's our development?' Landowner aspirations and environmentalist agendas in Western Solomon Islands, The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology 2(2): 44-67.

Foale () Coral reef conservation and science education ().pdf

Foale (2001) Where’s our development (article).pdf

Foale and Manele (2004) Social and political barriers and Marine Protected Areas (article).pdf

Foale and Macintyre (2005) Photographic representations of biodiversity and ecotourism (article).pdf

Macintyre and Foale (2004) Global imperatives and local desires competing economic and environmental interests in Melanesian communities (article).pdf

Macintyre and Foale (2007) Land and marine tenure, ownership and new forms of entitlement on Lihir (article).pdf

Foale (1998) Assessment and management of the Trochus industry in West Nggela (article).pdf

Sabetian and Foale (2006) Evolution of the artisanal fisher (article).pdf

*Furusawa, T., Maki, N., and Suzuki, S. (2008) Bacterical contamination of drinking water and nutritional quality of diet in the April 2, 2007, earthquake/tsunami devastated areas of the Western Solomon Islands. Tropical Medicine and Health, in press.

Aswani, S., Albert, S., Sabatian, A., and Furusawa, T. (2007) Customary management as precautionary and adaptive principles for protecting coral reefs in Oceania. Coral Reefs 26:1009-1021.

Aswani, S. and Furusawa, T. (2007) Do marine protected areas affect human nutrition and health?: A comparison between villages in Roviana, Solomon Islands. Coastal Management 35(5): 545-565.

Ohashi, J., Naka, I., Kimura, R., Natsuhara, K., Yamauchi, T., Furusawa, T., Nakazawa, M., Ataka, Y., Patarapotikul, J., Nuchnoi, P., Tokunaga, K., Ishida, T., Inaoka, T., Matsumura, Y., and Ohtsuka, R. (2007) FTO polymorphisms in Oceanic populations. Journal of Human Genetics 52:1031-1035.

*Suzuki, S., Maki, N., Furusawa, T., Hayashi, H., and Kawata, Y. (2007) Social Responses and Recovery Processes in the April 2, 2007 Earthquake Tsunami Disaster of theSolomon Islands. Journal of Japanese Society for Natural Disaster Science 26(2): 203-214. <In Japanese>

Furusawa, T. (2006) The Roles of Western biomedicine and folk medicine in rural Solomon Islands: A quantitative analysis of villagers' response to illness. Tropical Medicine and Health 34(2):83-91

Furusawa, T. and Ohtsuka, R. (2006) Inter-household variations in subsistence strategies within a rural society of Roviana, Solomon Islands: An analysis of agricultural production and cash income in relation to socio-demographic factors. Tropics 15 (1):29-38.

Ohashi, J., Naka, I., Kimura, R., Tokunaga, K., Yamauchi, T., Natsuhara, K., Furusawa, T., Yamamoto, R., Nakazawa, M., Ishida, T. and Ohtsuka, R. (2006) Polymorphisms in the ABO blood group gene in three populations in New Georgia Islands, Solomon Islands. Journal of Human Genetics 51(5):407-411

Furusawa, T. (2005). Effects of Population Increase and Cash Economy on Subsistence and Dietary Intake of Roviana-speaking Communities in Solomon Islands. Ph.D. Thesis School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo 2005.

Furusawa, T. (2004) Interrelations among humans, plants and animals based on folk knowledge. In Ohtsuka, R. (ed.) The Solomon Islands: Tropical Forest as the Last Frontier. University of Tokyo Press Tokyo pp. 55-81. <In Japanese>

Furusawa, T., Pahari, K., Umezaki, M. and Ohtsuka, R. (2004) Impacts of selective logging on New Georgia Island, Solomon Islands evaluated using very-high-resolution-satellite (IKONOS) data. Environmental Conservation 31(4):349-355

Nakazawa, M., Yamauchi, T., Tanaka, M., Ishimori, D., Furusawa, T., Midorikawa, T. and Ohtsuka, R. 2002 Community Health Assessment by Urine Dipstick Screening in Relation to the Variety of Lifestyles in the Solomon Islands. People and Culture in Oceania 18:35-44.

Furusawa (2006) Western biomedicine and folk medicine (TMH) (0.075MB)

Furusawa et al (2004) Impacts of selective logging (EC) (0.131MB)

Furusawa et al (2008) Bacterial contamination of drinking water (TMH) (0.369MB)

Nakazawa et al (2002) Community health assessment (PCO) (0.723MB)

Ohashi et al (2006) Polymorphisms in ABO blood group - New Georgia (JMG) (0.243MB)

Ohashi et al (2007) FTO polymorphisms (JHG) (0.211MB)

Suzuki et al (2007) Social responses and tsunami recovery (JJSNDS) (Japanese) (1.632MB)

Fujimoto et al (2008) Genetic determinants of human hair (HMG) (0.840MB)

Furusawa & Ohtsuka (2006) Inter-household variations (TROPICS) (0.388MB)

Hviding

2005. Reef and Rainforest: An Environmental Encyclopedia of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands Kiladi oro vivineidi ria tingitonga pa idere oro pa goana pa Marovo. Knowledges of Nature Series, No. 1. Paris: UNESCO. 252pp. ISBN 92-990041-0-2

2000. Islands of Rainforest: Agroforestry, Logging and Ecotourism in Solomon Islands. Aldershot: Ashgate. xvii + 371pp. ISBN 0-7546-1233-3 (Edvard Hviding & Tim Bayliss-Smith)

1996. Guardians of Marovo Lagoon: Practice, Place, and Politics in Maritime Melanesia. Pacific Islands Monograph Series, 14. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press. 473p. ISBN 0-8248-1664-1

1995. Vivinei tuari pa Ulusaghe: Stories and legends from Marovo, New Georgia, in four New Georgian languages and with English translations. Recorded, translated and edited by Edvard Hviding, with assistance from V. Vaguni and others. Bergen: Centre for Development Studies, University of Bergen, in collaboration with Western Province Division of Culture. 88pp. ISBN 82-7453-013-6

1993. The Rural Context of Giant Clam Mariculture in Solomon Islands: An Anthropological Study. ICLARM Technical Report 39. Manila: International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management. 93pp. ISBN 971-8709-39-8
(PDF - 5,9 MB)


2006. ”Knowing and managing biodiversity in the Pacific Islands: challenges of conservation in the Marovo Lagoon.”  International Social Science Journal , 58(1) Issue 187: 69-85. ISSN 0020-8701

2003. ”CA* Comment” on S. Aswani & P. Sheppard, “The archaeology and ethnohistory of exchange in precolonial and colonial Roviana”. Current Anthropology 2003, 44 (5 Supplement Dec 03): S72-S73. ISSN 0011-3204.

2003.“Between Knowledges: Pacific Studies and Academic Disciplines”. The Contemporary Pacific15:43-73. ISSN 1043-898X.

2003. “Contested rainforests, NGOs and projects of desire in Solomon  Islands”International Social Science Journal 55 (4) Issue 178: 439-453. ISSN 0020-8701

2003. “Rainforest composition and histories of human disturbance in Solomon Islands”Ambio, 32: 346-352. ISSN 0044-7447 (T. Bayliss-Smith, E. Hviding & T.C. Whitmore)

2003. “Fieldwork with Bob: ‘The first man to dive all night’ ”Traditional Marine Resource Managemnent and Knowledge Bulletin, Special Edition (March 2003): 19-21. ISSN 1025-7497

2002. “Le savoir traditionnel des pêcheurs du lagon de Marovo (Îles Salomon) concernant le comportement grégaire des poissons.” Ressources Marines et Traditions, Bulletin d’Information, No. 12:24-31. ISSN 1025-7497 (R.E. Johannes & Edvard Hviding)

2000. “Traditional knowledge possessed by the fishers of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands, concerning fish aggregating behavior.” Traditional Marine Resource Management and Knowledge Bulletin, No.12: 22-29. ISSN 1025-7497 (R.E. Johannes & Edvard Hviding)

1998. “Contextual flexibility: present status and future of customary marine tenure in Solomon Islands.” Ocean & Coastal Management, 40:253-269. ISSN 0964-5691

1998. “Western movements in non-Western worlds: towards an anthropology of uncertain encounters.” Journal of the Finnish Anthropological Society, 23(3):30-51. ISSN 0355-3930

1994. “Community-based fisheries management, tradition and the challenges of development in Marovo, Solomon Islands”. Development and Change, 25(1):13-39. ISSN 0012-155X (Edvard Hviding & Graham B.K. Baines)

1993. “Indigenous essentialism? ‘Simplifying’ customary land ownership in New Georgia, Solomon Islands.”Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 149: 802-824. ISSN 006-2294

1992. “Marine resources management in the context of customary tenure.” Marine Resource Economics, 7:249-273. ISSN 0738-1360 (Kenneth Ruddle, Edvard Hviding & R.E. Johannes)

1991. “Traditional institutions and their role in contemporary coastal resource management in the Pacific Islands.” NAGA, The ICLARM Quarterly, 14(4):3-6. ISSN 00116-290X

2006. ”Foreword”, in Babata: Our Land, Our Tribe, Our People, by Wilson Gia Liligeto. IPS Publications. Suva: Institute of Pacific Studies, University of the South Pacific. ISBN 978-982-02-0382-2

2005. “Christian Fellowship Church”, in Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature, Bron Taylor (ed.), 306-307. London: Continuum Books. ISBN 1-84371-138-9

2003. “Both Sides of the Beach: Knowledges of Nature in Oceania”, in Nature Across Cultures: Non-Western Views of the Environment and Nature, Helaine Selin (ed.), 243-275. Science Across Cultures: The History of Non-Western Sciences, Volume 4. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. ISBN 1-4020-1235-7.

2003. “Disentangling the butubutu of New Georgia: cognatic kinship in thought and action”, in Oceanic Socialities and Cultural Forms: Ethnographies of Experience, I. Hoëm & S. Roalkvam (eds.), 71-113. Oxford: Berghahn Books. ISBN 1-57181-558-9.

2001. “Islands Connected: Making Pacific Worlds (Project Presentation)”, in Migrations and Exchange in a Historical Perspective, P. Wallin (ed.), 4-9. No Barriers Seminar Papers, Vol. III. Oslo: The Kon-Tiki Museum, Institute for Pacific Archaeology and Cultural History. ISSN 1501-584X. (Jonathan Friedman & Edvard Hviding)

1999. “Western movements in non-Western worlds: towards an anthropology of uncertain encounters”, inPostcolonialism and Cultural Resistance, J. Nyman &  J.A. Stotesbury (eds.), 3-23. Studia Carelica Humanistica, 14. Joensuu: Faculty of Humanities, University of Joensuu. ISBN 951-708-778-0. (reprinted from Journal of the Finnish Anthropological Society, 23)

1999. “Taro irrigation, arboriculture and stratified polities in coastal Melanesia: evidence from the pre-colonial agricultural systems of New Georgia”, in Archaeology, Agriculture and Identity, P. Wallin (ed.), 17-24. No Barriers Seminar Papers, Vol. II. Oslo: The Kon-Tiki Museum, Institute for Pacific Archaeology and Cultural History. ISSN 1501-584X 
                             
1997.  “Fisheries and coastal resources: knowledge and development”, in Environment and Development in the Pacific Islands, B. Burt & C. Clerk (eds.), 123-142. Port Moresby & Canberra: University of Papua New Guinea Press/NDRC, Australian National University. ISBN 0-7315-2351-2.

1996. “Custom and complexity: marine tenure, fisheries management and conservation in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands”, in Resources, Nations and Indigenous Peoples: case studies from Australasia, Melanesia and Southeast Asia, R. Howitt, J. Connell & P Hirsch (eds.), 66-87. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-553758-0 (Edvard Hviding & Graham B.K. Baines)

1996. “Nature, culture, magic, science: on meta-languages for comparison in cultural ecology”, in Nature and Society: Anthropological Perspectives, P. Descola & G. Pálsson (eds.), 165-184. London: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-13215-0 / 0-415-13216-9

1995. “Maritime travel, present and past, in Marovo, Western Solomon Islands”, in Seafaring in the Modern Pacific Islands: Studies in Continuity and Change, R. Feinberg (ed.), 90-113. DeKalb, Ill.: Northern Illinois University Press. ISBN 0-87580-201-X

1994. “Traditional marine tenure and management: challenges, experiences, and prospects”, in Traditional Marine Tenure and the Sustainable Management of Marine Resources in Asia and the Pacific, G.R. South, D. Goulet, S. Tuqiri & M. Church (eds.), 88-100. Suva: University of the South Pacific/International Ocean Institute Operational Centre. ISBN 982-01-0241-3

1994. “Community-based fisheries management, tradition and the challenges of development in Marovo, Solomon Islands”, in Development and Environment: Sustaining People and Nature, Dharam Ghai (ed.), 13-39. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 0-631-19394-4. (Edvard Hviding & Graham B.K. Baines, reprinted from Development and Change, 25).

1993. “Traditional environmental knowledge for resource management in Marovo, Solomon Islands”, inTraditional Ecological Knowledge: Wisdom for Sustainable Development, N.M. Williams & G.B.K. Baines (eds.), 56-65. Canberra: Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University. ISBN 0-86740-414-0 (Graham B.K. Baines & Edvard Hviding)

1992. “Traditional Environmental Knowledge from the Marovo Area of the Solomon Islands”, in LORE: Capturing Traditional Environmental Knowledge, Martha Johnson (ed.), 92-110. Ottawa: International Development Research Centre. ISBN 0-88936-644-6 (Graham B.K. Baines & Edvard Hviding)

1990. “Keeping the sea: aspects of marine tenure in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands”, in Traditional Coastal Resource Management in the Pacific Basin: An Anthology, K. Ruddle & R.E. Johannes (eds.), 7-44. Jakarta: UNESCO-Regional Office for Science and Technology for Southeast Asia.

Hviding, Edvard 2008. Reef and Rainforest: An Environmental Encyclopedia of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands / A Pilot Project in Vernacular Environmental Education for the Pacific Islands. STUDY GUIDE AND TEACHER’S MANUAL. Paris: UNESCO/LINKS.

Hviding, Edvard 2005. Village-level Documentation and Transmission of
Local Environmental Knowledge: A Pilot Project for Solomon Islands.
 Report to UNESCO-LINKS. Paris: UNESCO.

1991.  A regional assessment of the potential role of customary marine tenure (CMT) systems in contemporary fisheries management in the South Pacific. Honiara: South Pacific Forum Fisheries Agency, FFA Reports 91/71. 22pp. (Edvard Hviding & Kenneth Ruddle)

1989. “All things in our sea”: The dynamics of customary marine tenure, Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands. NRI Special Publication No. 13. Boroko, Papua New Guinea: National Research Institute. 30pp. ISBN 9980-75-021-9.

(Kinch) World Fish Center WWF-SI report on post-tsunami fisheries livelihoods.pdf

Kinch (2004) Aqu Trade Western.pdf

Kinch (2005) Socioeconomic Analysis Coral Trade Sols.pdf

Kinch (2005) Sol Rubralineata.pdf

Kinch et al (2006) Community Engagement Marovo.pdf

Kinch et al (2006) Soc Econ Marovo IWP.pdf

KUPIAINEN, JARI 1997: “Art, Culture Change, and the Study of Solomon Islands Woodcarving”. Dialogue and Universalism. Special Issue, ed. Sonja Servomaa. 7:3-4. 161-170.

KUPIAINEN, JARI 1997: “The Colonial Transformation of Woodcarving in Bellona and Gatokae in the Solomon Islands”. Journal of the Finnish Anthropological Society. 22:1. 18-30.

KUPIAINEN, JARI 1999: “Kastom, Authenticity and Woodcarving in the Solomon Islands”. In Jopi Nyman and John A. Stotesbury ed.: Postcolonialism and Cultural Resistance. Studia Carelica Humanistica 14. University of Joensuu. Joensuu. 123-129.

KUPIAINEN, JARI 1999: “Toto isus, Charms and Photos: Visual Ethnography on Gatokae, Western Solomon Islands”. SIGHTS – Visual Anthropology Forumhttp://cc.joensuu.fi/sights/jari.htm. Publication date 31.5.1999.

KUPIAINEN, JARI 2000: Tradition, Trade and Woodcarving in Solomon Islands. Transactions of the Finnish Anthropological Society 45 (including a cd-rom). The Finnish Anthropological Society and the Intervention Press. Helsinki, Finland and Höjbjerg, Denmark.

KUPIAINEN, JARI 2001: Melanesian Encounters - Rencontre mélanésienne. Photographic Exhibition. The UNESCO Building, UNESCO and CNRS Conference “Indigenous Identities: Oral, Written Expressions and New Technologies”. Paris, France. 15.-18.5.2001 (40 photos).

KUPIAINEN, JARI 2006: “Translocalisation Over the Net: Digitalisation, Information Technology and Local Cultures in Melanesia”. E-Learning. Vol.3, No.3. 2006. 279-290.http://www.wwwords.co.uk/elea/content/pdfs/3/issue3_3.asp.
Published also: http://www.peoplefirst.net.sb/research/

N. Duke, M. Love, S. Albert, J. Udy, A. Ross, I. Tibbetts, C. Roelfsema, R.W. Carter, J. Corrin-Care and D. Neil (2007)  The UQ Marovo Experience: science-based support for community management of marine resources.  In Duke et al. (eds) Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  pp. 11-27.  The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

M. Love (2006) Projected epistemologies and unintended consequences: in consideration of environmental change and marine protected areas in Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  B.A. Honours thesis, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

M. Love and A. Ross (2006) Preliminary anthropological field report: UQ Solomon Marovo Project Report.  University of Queensland, Brisbane.

M. Love, A. Ross and J. Corrin-Care (2007) Strengthening community capacity.  In Duke et al. (eds) Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  pp. 85-97. The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

M. Love and A. Ross (2007)  Social and cultural considerations.  In Duke et al. (eds) Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  pp. 99-109.  The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

M. Love, A. Ross, J. Udy, R.W. Carter and C. Howell (2007)  Economic considerations.  In Duke et al. (eds)Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  pp. 111-127.  The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

M. Love, J. Corrin-Care and A. Ross with S. Albert, I. Tibbetts, J. Udy. C. Roelfsema and N. Duke (2007) Lessons learned, future directions and recommendations.  In Duke et al. (eds) Conserving the marine biodiversity of Marovo Lagoon: development of environmental management initiative that will conserve the marine biodiversity and productivity of Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  pp. 129-141.  The University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Love (2006) Environmental change and marine protected areas in Marovo lagoon (BA Hons thesis).pdf

Mann (1996) Fate of Oceanic plateaus at subduction zones (report).pdf

Mann et al ( 1998) Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia group (article).pdf

Mann and Taira (2004) Global tectonic significance of the Solomon Islands and Ontong Java Plateau convergent zone (article).pdf

Cowley et al (2004) Recent tectonic history of the Central Solomons intra-arc basin (article).pdf

Taira et al (2004) Incipient subduction of the Ontong Java Plateau (article).pdf

Phinney et al (1999) Sequence stratigraphy, structure and tectonic history of the southwestern Ontong Java Plateau (article).pdf

Phinney et al (2003) Sequence stratigraphy, structural style and age of deformation of the Malaita accretionary prism (article).pdf

Under review. McDougall, D. & J. Kere. n.d. Christianity, Custom, and Law: Conflict and Peacemaking in the Post-conflict Solomon Islands. In Mediating Across Difference: Indigenous, Oceanic and Asian Approaches to Conflict Resolution (eds) M. Brigg & R. Bleiker.

2008. “Religious institutions as Alternative Structures in post-conflict Solomon Islands: Cases from Western Province.” For State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Discussion Paper Series, 08/05, Australian National University.

2008. D. McDougall, I. Barry, S. Pio. Disaster and Recovery on Ranongga: Six Months After the Earthquake in the Western Solomons. Independent report.

2005. “The Unintended Consequences of Clarification: Development, Disputing, and the Dynamics of Community in Ranongga, Solomon Islands,” Ethnohistory 52 (1): 81-109.

2003. “Fellowship and Citizenship as Models of National Community: United Church Women's Fellowship in Ranongga, Solomon Islands,” Oceania 74 (1-2): 61-80.

2000. “Paths of Pinauzu: Captivity and Social Reproduction in Ranongga,” Journal of the Polynesian Society 109 (1): 99-113.


McDougall (2000) Pinauzu in Ranongga (JPS).pdf

McDougall (2003) Fellowship and Citizenship in United Church in Ranongga (Oceania).pdf

McDougall (2005) Community and dispute in Ranongga (Ethnohistory).pdf

McDougall (2007) Ranongga Disaster Recovery (report).pdf

McDougall (2008) Religious Institutions as alternative structures in post-conflict Solomon Islands.pdf

Obata (2003) A grammar of Bilua (monograph) (4.355 MB).pdf 

2007. (With Peter Budd) ‘Community-oriented outcomes of language documentation in Melanesia.’ In Peter K. Austin, Oliver Bond and David Nathan, eds. Proceedings of Conference on Language Documentation and Linguistic Theory. London: Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project. 51-57.

Raymond and Budd (2007) Community and Language in Melanesia (paper).pdf

Reeve, Rowland 1990. “The Early History of the Western Province: Results of Recent
Investigations”. 'O'O, A Journal of Solomon Island Studies, 1990.

Reeve, Rowland 1989. “Recent Work On The Prehistory of the Western Solomons.”  Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association, Volume 9.

Reeve, Rowland 1987. “Report of the Operation Raleigh Solomon Islands Expedition”. Archaeology, 1987.

Reeve (1989) Prehistory of W.-Solomons (article).pdf

Richards, Rhys and Kenneth Roga 2005. Not Quite Extinct: Melanesian bark cloth (‘tapa’) from Western Solomon Islands. Wellington, NZ: Paremata Press. ISBN 0-9582013-2-3. 100p.

Richards, Rhys (in press) “Short Sighted Gods, a Stone Age Devaluation, and Small Change for Pocketless Societies:  Ceramic Imitation Arm Rings for Indigenous Trade In the Solomon Islands 1880-1920.” Records of the Auckland Museum. Accepted for publication mid-2008.

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Richard, Rhys 2006. “Whale Teeth Artifacts in the western Solomon Islands.” Tuhinga, 17: 69-79. Te Papa Museum of New Zealand.

Richards, Rhys and Kenneth Roga 2004. “Barava: Land Title Deeds in Fossil Shell from Western Solomons.”Tuhinga, 15: 17-26. Te Papa Museum of New Zealand.

Richards, Rhys 2001. Kimbo Stone Figures from the Western Solomon Islands.” 
Journal of Pacific  Arts , 23/24: 103-112. Honolulu.

Richards, Rhys 1999. Spirit of Solomons and Traditional Art Styles in Solomon 
Islands. Exhibition  Catalogue. Pataka, Porirua Museum of Arts and  Cultures, May 1999. [Collection of Rhys and Margaret Richards]. 16p.

Grinham 2007  Downstream effects of land use on shallow-water benthic microalgal communities in Moreton Bay, Australia, and Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands.  PhD thesis, University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Schwarz, A., Hawes, I., Manele, B., Makini, D., Posala, R., Tauku, M.
(2007). Mangrove, seagrass and macroalgae resources on reefs in Darwin
Initiative Project sites, Solomon Islands. Report prepared for WWF Solomon
Islands.

Schwarz, A., Ramofafia, C., Bennett, G., Notere, D., Tewfik, A., Oengpepa,
C., Manele, B., Kere, N. (2007). After the earthquake: An assessment of the
impact of the earthquake and tsunami on fisheries-related livelihoods in
coastal communities of Western Province, Solomon Islands. Report to the
Solomon Islands Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources prepared by the
WorldFish Center and WWF-Solomon Islands Programme. 82p.

Sheppard
A revised model of Solomon Islands culture history .pdf

Stubbs (1999) Ranongga Simbo Project (Report) (0.125MB).pdf

Mann et al ( 1998) Quaternary uplift of the New Georgia group (article) (5.5MB) .pdf

Schmidt et al (2004). A semi-annual radiocarbon record of a modern coral from Solomon Islands (article).pdf

Taylor et al (2005) Rapid forearc uplift and subsidence caused by impinging bathymetric features (article).pdf

Taylor et al (2007) Crustal deformation in Gizo great earthquake (report).pdf

Taylor, F. W., R. W. Briggs, C. Frohlich, A. Brown, M. Hornbach, A. K. Papabatu, A. Meltzner, and D. Billy, 2008, Rupture across arc segment and plate boundaries in the 1 April 2007 Solomons earthquake, Nature Geoscience,1, 253-257. 
http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/staff2html/staff/Michael_Fisher.html
Fisher, M.A., Geist, E.L.., Sliter, R., Wong, F.L., Reiss, C., and Mann, D.M., 2007, Preliminary analysis of the earthquake  (MW 8.1) and tsunami of April 1, 2007, in the Solomon Islands, Southwestern Pacific Ocean, Science of Tsunami Hazards, 26, 20 pp.

http://www.gtsav.gatech.edu/go/faculty/fritz
Hermann Fritz is at Georgia Tech University in Savannah, Georgia, USA.
Fritz, H.M., and Kalligeris, N., 2007, Ancestral heritage saves tribes during 1 April 2007
Solomon Islands tsunami, Geophys. Res. Letts., 35, L01607, doi:10.1029/2007GL031654.

 

Maffi, L. and E. Woodley and others. 2007, Biodiversity and Culture. Section 9 of Chapter 5, Biodiversity, GEO 4 Report, UNEP.

Woodley, E., Crowley, E. and others. 2008. Cultural indicators of Indigenous Peoples' food and agro-ecological systems.  For UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and the International Indian Treaty Council (IITC).

Maffi, L. and E. Woodley. In press. Global Source Book on Biocultural DiversityWorldwide Experiences in an Integrated Approach to the Conservation of Biodiversity and Culture (forthcoming 2008). Progress report available at http://www.terralingua.org/GSBBCD.htm.

Harmon, D. J. Loh, and others (E. Woodley).  In preparation for the World Conservation Congress, Oct 2008. Measuring and Monitoring State and Trends in Biodiversity and Culture. Background paper presented at the symposium“Sustaining Cultural and Biological Diversity in a Rapidly Changing World: Lessons for Global Policy” for the American Museum of Natural History, New York City, April 2-5, 2008.

Woodley, E. 2005.  Local and Indigenous Ecological Knowledge as an Emergent Property of a Complex System: A Case Study in the Solomon Islands, In: Source Book on Participatory Research and Development. CIP-UPWARD (International Potato Center-Users' Perspectives with Agricultural Research and Development) IDRC and IFAD.
 
Ericksen, P. and E. Woodley, E.  2005.  Using Multiple Knowledge Systems: Benefits and Challenges.  Chapter 5. Multiscale Assessments Volume 4 of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (eds Capistrano, D., Samper, C.K., Lee, M.J and Raudsepp-Hearne, C.).

Woodley, E. 2004.  Local and Indigenous Ecological Knowledge as an Emergent Property of a Complex System: A Case Study in the Solomon Islands.  Paper presented at Bridging Scales and Epistemologies Conference, Alexandria, Egypt, March 17-20, 2004.

Woodley, E. 2001. Incorporation of Indigenous Knowledge in Sustainable Use of Biodiversity Projects. Presentation and Report for IDRC, November 13, 2001, Montreal, Quebec.

Woodley, E. 2001. Taro Caught in the Web of Change: Food Security on Vella Lavella, Solomon Island. Paper presented to the annual Conference of the Association of the Society of Anthropologists for Oceania (ASAO), February, 2001, Florida, USA.

.Woodley, E. 1999. Indigenous Ecological Knowledge for Resource Management: 
Constraints to Implementation (paper presented for Qualifying Exam, University of Guelph)

Woodley, E. 1998.Ranonggan Carvers: Stories and River Stones   Paradise
Magazine, 127: 53-55.

Woodley, E. 1991.  Indigenous Ecological Knowledge and Development.  In:     Agriculture and Human Values8(1,2):173-178.

Woodley - Indigenous knowledge (paper).pdf

Woodley (2002) Local Knowledge in Vella Lavella( PhD Thesis).pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Animals and plants of western Solomons

Forests and food gardens

About the sea and fishing

The earth and the seabed – geology

Management of land and sea resources

Natural disasters

Cultural heritage and languages

Customary law and modern law

History and the ways of ancestors

Knowledge and learning

Religions and the roles of churches

Prominent Western Solomon Islanders

Development and change 

 

Western Solomons
westernsolomons.uib.no
Updated 12 January, 2011